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WORLD WAR I
CASUALTIES OF AMERICAN ARMY OVERSEAS

REPORTED ON DEC 16, 1918

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KILLED IN ACTION

CAPTAINS

Martin G. Griffin, Fall River, Mass.
John Breckenridge Warfield, Woodbine, Md.

LIEUTENANTS

Kenneth C. Bell, Pasadena, Cal.
Sampson B. Brashear, Viper, Ky.
J. C. Cox, Tonkawa, Okla.
Gastol, L. Dortch, Goldsboro, N. C.
Charles Hetherington, Alpine, N. Y.
Stephen, V. Hopkins, New York.
Arthur W. Horne, Farmington, N. H.
Alva E. Kennedy, New York.
Richard F. Kirkpatrick, Knoxville, Tenn.
Albert A. Lamb, Donald, Ore.
John C. Leacell, Salem, Va.
Rayburn, B. Melendy, Quincy, Mass.
Walter A. Philips, Nixon, Tex.
George Reed Jr., Memphis, Tenn.
Edgar E. Roberts, Chico, Cal.
John J. Rudin, Hinsdale, Mass.
Philip J. Seeger, St. Louis, Mo.
Abernethy S. Taylor, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Sergt. James Moncravie, Irving, Ill.

PRIVATES

Roy W. Hamm, Monticello, Ill.
Fred L. Alvord, Olney, Ill.

WOUNDED SEVERELY

CAPTAINS

Leroy H. Hammonds, Appleton, Tenn.
William T. Busch, Sioux City, Ia.
Theodore B. Keating, Buffalo, N. Y.
Charles L. Sheridan, Bozeman, Mont.
Daniel G. Fowle, Washington, N. C.
William D. Scarbrough, Galion, O.
Ben S. Hudson, Fredonia, Kas.
William K. Meadow, Elberton, Ga.

LIEUTENANTS

Samuel R. Bryson, Mauch Chunk, Pa.
Thomas L. Cort, Mount Pleasant, Pa.
Abraham S. Goldman, Dorchester, Mass.
Galvin A. Finley, West Brighton, N. Y.
Walter H. Kirkpatrick, Hutchinson, Kas.
Owen H. Perry, Helena, Mont.
Stephen O. Slaughter, Kansas City, Mo.
Guy Z. Stover, Logantown, Pa.
Clyde A. Ames, Burlington, Vt.
James Anderson, Easley, S. C.
William Anderson, New York City.
Clyde H. Butler, Massillon, O.
Sidney C. Hadsall, Scranton, Pa.
James J. Walsh, none given.
James E. Darst, Ferguson, Mo.
Nelson W. Edens, Clio, S. C.
Salmon P. Hebard, Malba, N. Y.
John S. Leclereq, Dallas, Tex.
Milton M. McCaull, Walville, Md.
Fred Taylor Peck, St. Louis, Mo.
Albert J. Shartle, Philadelphia, Pa.
Morgan V. Spicer, Laramie, Wyo.
Thomas H. Boyd, Portland, Ore.
Nicholas H. Kiley, Cazenovia, N. Y.
Jesse L. McLaughlin, Maplewood, Mo.
Charles R. Marquiss, Oronogo, Mo.
James M. Wilson, Kalamazoo, Mich.

SERGEANTS

Harvey Walker, Port Byron, Ill.
Oscar Elmer Alt, Effingham, Ill.

CORPORAL

Charles E. Hosler, Monticello, Ill.
Charles A. McBride, Henry, Ill.
Albert Pohl, Coal City, Ill.
Thomas Berl Walters, Elkville, Ill.

BUGLER

Eber Reney, Bethany, Ill.

PRIVATES

August W. Anders, Oreland, Ill.
George L. Long, Mount Sterling, Ill.
Frank J. McGee, Dimmundy, Ill.
Clarence E. Reynolds, Waverly, Ill.

---------------

CHICAGOANS IN THE LISTS

ARMY

KILLED IN ACTION

PRIVATES

Miskowiec, Frank J., 1540 Emma street.
Osaba, Joseph, 622 Bunker street.
Ratz, Emil, 8702 Exchange avenue.

WOUNDED SEVERELY

SERGEANTS

Ross, Frank A., 1514 Dixon street.
Albrecht, Fred, Jr., 6834 South May street.

PRIVATES

Btkos, Joseph, 3254 South Morgan street.
Brown, James F., 4242 North Paulina street.
Grafanaker, Otto, 436 Conner street.
Cotton, Donald P., 189 West Madison street.
Lent, Harley C., 241 Stanley terrace.
Sage, Frank, 2046 Lincoln avenue.
Thomas, David P., 601 Julian street, Waukegan.
Lundquist, David W., Jr., 7125 Cottage Grove avenue.
May, James M., 3266 Vernon avenue.
Schmanski, Arthur J., 7046 Dante avenue.
Jamieson, Thomas B., 739 West Sixty-first street.
Rice, John, Marine Firemen's union.
Spoden, John G., 4521 West Lawrence avenue.

MISSING IN ACTION

LIEUTENANT

Mathews, Richard P., 6711 Stewart avenue.

PRIVATES

Sublesky, John, 2638 West Twenty-third place.
Cogan, John R., 1845 Halsted street.

---------------

Elmer H. Eller, Pekin, Ill.
Gustaaf Mille, Atkinson, Ill.
Wm. Fred Lobsinger, Belleville, Ill.
Charley F. Olson, Clyde, Ill.
Sidney C. Martin, Lincoln, Ill.
James E. Burns, East St. Louis, Ill.
Obediah Capman, Mount Vernon, Ill.
Arthur F. Jeschke, Hillside, Ill.
Leslie S. Miller, Benton, Ill.
Harry Schlichtman, Schattuc, Ill.
David E. Sims, Troy, Ill.
George Heal Jr., Custon, Ill.
Ora C. Hughes, Pulaski, Ill.
George Stoefontzanskin, Canton, Ill.
Sewell Womacks, Champaign, Ill.
Arthur H. Watson, Cisne, Ill.
Elmer H. Schuman, Beardstown, Ill.
William T. Sills, Hoopeston, Ill.

MISSING IN ACTION

LIEUTENANTS

Clarence A. Hastings, Port Richard, N. Y.
Gordon E. Knowles Marianna, Fla.
Raymond J. Saunders, Billings, Mont.
John Henry Weimer, Beach City, O.

PRIVATES

John L. Meinhart, Jewett, Ill.
George V. Goldsmith, Huey, Ill.
Cesare Constantine, South Wilmington, Ill.
================================================
From the Chicago Tribune, Dec. 16, 1918:

F. L. Young, Killed in War, Prominent Cue Player 
Francis L. Young, news of whose death in France was received this 
week, was one of the best amateur billiard players in the city. Tom 
Foley, at whose room he player, said that Young had as fine a stroke 
as any player he ever knew, and with an ability to average from 7 to 
10 at balkline, was a prospective amateur champion. He was with the 
Ninety-seventh company of the Sixth marines and was wounded several 
times in engagements around Chateau Thierry.

MRS. PERSHING 'S EFFORTS FAIL TO SAVE HERO LIFE

Takes Ill and Wounded Aviator from Train, but He Dies. 
How a wounded hero, returning from French battlefields, arrived in 
the United States, was placed on a train for home, only to contract 
a fatal attack of pneumonia, was brought to light yesterday by James 
Pershing, brother of the general.

On Thursday a crippled soldier, an aviation lieutenant, assisted by 
a private, stumbled into the Red Cross canteen at the La Salle street 
depot. He was so weak that he could scarcely walk.

Workers at the canteen, among whom was Mrs. James Pershing, took him 
in charge. Mrs. Pershing saw the man's condition was such that 
further travel was out of the question, so she called a taxi and took 
him to Hotel La Salle.

Could Scarcely Speak.

The young lieutenant was so weak that he could scarcely give his name 
-- Charles D. V. Murray of Denver, Colo. Having seen that he was taken 
to a room and made as comfortable as possible by the hotel house 
physician, Mrs. Pershing set out to find a nurse for him. For two 
days both Mr. and Mrs. Pershing hunted unsuccessfully, and the young 
man grew weaker. He died early yesterday morning.

The story was told by Mr. Pershing to the friends and relatives of 
men in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth field artillery auxiliary 
yesterday.

"My wife saw this young lieutenant taken off the train," he said. "He 
suffered from having been shot through both hips. My wife and I tried 
to get a nurse for him, but were unable to do so until last night. He 
passed away this morning."

Died Among Strangers.

"The young officer's death," Mr. Pershing told a TRIBUNE reporter, 
"seems to me to indicate a somewhat lagging spirit. It seems a pity 
that, returning as he did, wounded, and having offered his body to 
bullets of the enemy, this boy -- he was hardly 25 -- should die a 
stranger in a great city like Chicago."

It developed that even death did not end all the difficulties 
connected with the unfortunate young officer. After his death the 
hotel management notified the army and the health department. 
Considerable time was necessary for the issuance of a permit for 
removal of the body.

The police were called to facilitate removal, but they refused to 
interfere when they learned that it was not a coroner's case and was 
the affair of the army. Finally a permit was secured and the body 
taken in charge by the A. L. Bennet Undertaking company. Later, 
because death was due to pneumonia, the body was removed to the 
Graceland vaults.

His Relatives Notified.

On Saturday the lieutenant requested that his relatives in Denver and 
a brother-in-law, W. A. Isenberg of Sheridan, Ia., be notified of his 
illness. Mr. Isenberg arrived in Chicago last night.

"I did not even know that Charles was wounded," he said to a TRIBUNE 
reporter.

According to Mr. Isenberg, the lieutenant had been in France for 
about six months.

CHICAGOAN, FIVE DAYS "NEXT DOOR TO HELL", GASSED

Sergeant in 132d Tells of Death Trap They Held. 
About the time the Germans had developed their most furious resistance 
to the American offensive in the Argonne, the Third battalion of the 
One Hundred and Thirty-second infantry was sent to hold an advanced 
position.

"It was really a death trap for us," writes Sergt. David E. Caesar to 
his brother, E. Richard Caesar of 3932 Southport avenue. "We occupied 
a bottle shaped position in the woods, with Jerry all around us, his 
heavy artillery playing on us from three sides. Shells at the rate of 
a hundred a minute came screeching over us -- shrapnel, whiz-bangs, 
everything from a monkey wrench to the biggest thing he had.

"Next Door to Hell."

"Five days we held this trap with no relief. Not even water could be 
had. It was impossible to get rations up to us, as our ration parties 
were always shot up. It was next door to hell. On the fifth day I got 
it. We had no trenches, just small holes. I was standing near my hole 
when I heard the whistle of a shell. I said to myself, 'It's got my 
name on it.' It seemed to be coming straight toward me. I dived for 
my hole. The shell, a high explosive with a charge of blue-x gas, hit 
about three yards away. I didn't have time to fix my mask and I got a 
good dose of the gas."

Sergt. Caesar was sent to a first station, and later to a base 
hospital in France, where he is recovering. He had been in the front 
line altogether thirty-six days.

Two Cousins Die.

The death of two cousins was reported by relatives yesterday. Private 
Alex Porte, One Hundred and Twentieth field artillery, 624 Maxwell 
street, died of wounds received at St. Saumme. Private Samuel A. 
Porte, Three Hundred and Sixteenth engineers, 1327 Jefferson street, 
was killed in action in the last battle of St. Mihiel.

A number of men were reported wounded. They are:

Private Fred A. Lichtenstein, Company B, Twelfth machine gun battalion, 
son of Mrs. Lisette Lichtenstein of 616 West Sixtieth street, and a 
brother of Sergt. Carl A. Lichtenstein, Battery A, Three Hundred and 
Thirtysecond field artillery of the Blackhawk division.

Lieut. Thomas Z. Casey, One Hundred and Thirty-first infantry, 2117 
Osgood street, whose brother, Sergt. Walter Casey, of the same 
regiment, was gassed.

Wounded as War Ends.

Private William S. Casey, Eleventh field artillery, wounded at 10:40 
o'clock on the morning of Nov. 11, twenty minutes before the armistice 
became effective. He lives at 5321 South Halsted street and was an 
employe of Wilson & Co., packers.

Sergt. George M. Sleezer, Forty-seventh infantry, 1520 Arthur place, 
Gary; Private Alexandro Dagostino, One Hundred and Thirty-first 
infantry, 1013 South Halsted street, and Private Thomas N. Kelley, 
One Hundred and Fourth infantry, 7729 Emerald avenue.

Corporal K. S. Sorensen; Sixtieth infantry, scout platoon, was wounded 
slightly. He is the brother of Alreda Sorensen, 203 Prospect avenue, 
Highland Park. Private Robert Newell of the Fifty-eighth battalion, 
Eighth Canadian reserves, also was wounded. His home is at 3724 
Cottage Grove avenue.

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