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Miscellaneous Rhea County, Tennessee Obituaries


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MICAJAH CLACK
IN MEMORIAM
Died, August 16th., 1886, at his residence in Rhea County, Tenn., Mr. Micajah Clack, aged 87 yrs., 2 Mo., and 25 days. He was born in Wayne County, Ky., May 21st, 1799. His father removed with him to Sevier County, Tenn., while he was a lad; where he grew up and was married to Miss Margaret Kerr, daughter of Robert and Amy Kerr, on the 28th day of Sept., 1820. He afterwards removed to Bradley County, Tenn., and from thence to Rhea County, Tenn about the year 1839. He leaves surviving him four sons and two daughters, (his wife and four sons have fallen asleep). He made a public profession of his faith in Christ by uniting with the Baptist Church in July 1833, of which he lived a most acceptable member to the end of his life -beautifully exemplifying the character of a true christian.
Father's health had been declining for several years. His last illness was severe and protracted, but he bore his sufferings with christian fortitude. Often as he drew near the gates of death, he expressed himself as resting fully upon the merits of Christ for acceptance before God, as resigned to God's will, and ready to depart. He said Jesus was near and precious, and that he was drawing near his eternal home. Several times during the two last weeks of his life he called upon Bro. Johnson and others to sing for him, and amid intense sufferings he rejoiced and praised God.
He said he soon would be free from all pain and be with Christ. Thus his spirit passed away, in peace and tranquility, through the gate of death to join his kindred spirits, and to increase and enliven the happified throngs in the home of the blessed. His devoted children, relatives and friends mourn his departure with the firm belief that he has joined the crown of the finally faithful. "May our last end be like his."
His remains were intered according to his own dictationsin the Clack burrying ground, near James Ewing's, at 9:30 o'clock a. m., on the 17th inst., amid a large crowd of friends. Love for his many virtues and a tear of sorrow to his memory. W.R.C. Roddy, Tenn., August 25th, 1886

MARGARET (Kerr) CLACK
IN MEMORIAM
Mrs. Margaret (Kerr) Clack, wife of Micajah Clack, was born in Sevier County, Tennessee, June 5th, 1796, and died at her husband's residence in Rhea County, Tennessee, September 10th, 1877, aged 84 years, 3 months and 5 days.
The deceased won the respect and confidence of all who knew her, by her strict integrity on character, and her quiet peaceable life. She was a considerate and dutiful wife, a tenderly affectionate mother, a faithful friend and a kind neighbor. She made a public profession of her faith in Christ, by uniting with the Baptist church in the year 1833, of which she lived a most acceptable member until her death, beautifully exemplifying the character of a true christian. She exhibited her profession by a scrupuous observance and constant practice of christian duties., In her fireside conversation, she often spoke of the peerless excellence of the 'man Christ Jesus' and often while discanting upon the beauties of holiness, now lowering cloud meanwhile intercepted her soul's sunshine; and she rejoiced in hope of a blessed immortality beyond the grave. She ever acknowledged God as the primal source of every enjoyment. As a christian matron, she sought to lead her family into the golden paths of wisdom and holiness. Her deportment in every ..........in life was a continued display of blended virtues; a scene of practical religion, worthy the emulation of every christian.
Mother's health had been declining for several years previous to her death, though confined to her room and almost entirely helpless, yet she was cheerful, and always greeted her friends with a pleasant smile and a hearty welcome. (She was gored by a cow and was bedridden almost 10 years-EC)
Her last illness was severe and protracted, but she bore her afflictions with christian fortitude. Often as she drew near the gates of death, she expressed herself as resigned to God's will and ready to depart - All her thoughts, up to the hour of her death, seemed to be celestial, constantly marching onward to the realms of bliss ineffable. A short time before she expired, she called upon her children around her bed to sing that good old hymn, "O, sing to me of heaven; When I am called to die". Then her spirit passed away, in peace and tranquility, into the paradise of God, there to bask forever in the smiles of the blessed Redeemer. I feel rejoiced to know that when life was ebbing out as an evanesceat taper, she left the consoling evidence that all was well. Then in conclusion I would say, rest on, dear mother, with the pale sleepers of the silent city. By faith we behold thee robed and crowned for the society of heaven.
Dear Father, brothers and sisters, we are left to battle a while longer, while she has been called home by the Prince of Peace - Let us cherish her memory, as an influence irresistibly winning us to a land of perpetual light, and may we, as the fragments of a once happy family, meet her in heaven's bright world.

Wm. R. Clack
SABRIA NEWPORT CLACK
Spring City (By Herald Correspondent)
Mrs. Sabria Caroline Clack, widow of the late William Raleigh Clack, died Tuesday morning, May 15th, age 85 years,1 month and 10 days. She was the daughter of the late Rev. and Mrs. Asa Newport. She had been a devoted Christian since early girlhood and was the last (surviving - ECS) charter member of the Friendship Baptist Church. She is survived by six children, 25 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Her children are Mrs. S.M. Sharp of Spring City, with whom she made her home; Mrs. E.W. Galloway of Tampa, Fla.; Mrs. J.H. Manis of Bradenton, Fla.; Mrs. S.J. Galloway of West Plains, Mo.; H.B. Clack of Bozeman, Mont.; and R.M. Clack of Spring City. Funeral services were held from the Friendship Church Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, conducted by Rev. T.O. Dake, of Meigs County. Interment took place in the Friendship Cemetery. The following grandsons served as active pallbearers; William Clack, Jack Sharp, Ervin Simpson, Jas. Roddy, Morgan Clack and William Chattin.
(NOTE: The above list of 'grandsons' is inaccurate. Of those named, only William Clack and Morgan Clack were actually grandsons, the others were husbands of her granddaughters)

IN MEMORY
In Memory of Mrs. W.R. Clack, (Sabria Newport) of Roddy, Tenn., Who Departed This Life May 15th, 1934. Age 85 Years, 1 Month, 20 Days. Mother Because of the rain, there's a rainbow; Because of our work we have play; Because of the light of the stars at night there is peace at the close of the day; Because of our faith we are hopeful; Because of our love, we are true; Because of His heed of our constant need, Dear Mother, God gave us you. Although Mother has been gone from us one long year, yet she is ever present in our memory. Her every walk in life was a continued display of blended virtues; a scene of practical religion worthy the emulating of all who knew her. may we, as the fragments of a once happy family, join in the thoughts of the following lines: "Blessed hope, Oh cheering thought! We all may meet once more, when that good fight of faith is fought we'll reach that heavenly shore. Oh joyful meeting round the throne where angels tongues shall sing a glorious welcome, welcome home to Jesus Christ, our King.
By Mrs. J.H. Manis Bradenton, Fla.

W. ROLLIE CLACK
(William Raleigh Clack)Perhaps no man in Rhea county will be missed in more useful ways then the object of this sketch. He was born eighty years ago and had spent his entire life in this county ans was known and was highly respected by all who knew him. He was one of our best ............ and it was said of him that ............. men were like Rollie Clack there would be no use for laws to protect the good or restrain the bad.
He was a consistent member of the Baptist church sixty years, his seat hardly ever being vacant, and his influence was always on the right side of all religious or moral questions. He has been a Mason since 1864 and lived up to all its teachings. He was also a Confederate Veteran.
His funeral services were held at Old Friendship Church Sunday, April 27. The sermon, which was one of the most appropriate tributes the writer has ever listened to, was preached by Rev. Dake. The life of Brother Clack was a blessing to his neighbors, and to his family an inheritance that is more enduring than time and more to be treasured than wealth.
His body was tenderly laid to rest in the beautiful cemetery near Old Friendship Church by sorrowing friends, the service at the grave being conducted by Spring City Lodge A.F.&A.M.
The family have the heartfelt sympathy of his entire acquaintances, who are many, and we all join in saying "Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord".

OBITUARY OF OUR BELOVED BROTHER, W. R. CLACK
Whereas: God in his alwise providence, saw fit, on April 25th 1919, to call from our Church to the Church Triumphant our beloved brother, William Raleigh Clack, who was one of the two remaining charter members, whose names now stand upon our church roll, and who assisted liberally with his means and labor in building this church house, dedicated to the worship of Almighty God, and
Whereas, Brother Clack has served this Church as Clerk continuously since its organization in November 1875, to the present time, and has made us a good record, written in a plain, legible hand, covering about 265 pages, which record is self explanatory, and will stand as a living monument to the former actions of this Church, and Whereas, Brother Clack has served this Church as Deacon, for more than forty-three years, has lived an exemplary, christian life, been a faithful member of the Baptist Church for more than half a century, prompt in his attendance at church services, liberal in the support of the Church and all benevolent and charitable purposes; therefore, Be it resolved by the Church at old Friendship, that we pause for a few moments, in our march through time, to express our great appreciation for his long and faithful services to this Church, for his loyalty to God, and also for his moral and christian influence in the community.
Be it further resolved; that to sister (Sabria)Clack, his wife, who has so faithfully assisted him in all his work in the Masters cause, we express our deepest sympathy in her bereavement. May she lean upon the all-tried arm of our Savior, and as her physical strength declines, may her spiritual strength increase, and the light and hope of Heaven grow brighter and stronger, until the dawning of the perfect day. This June the 21st 1919. Respectfully submitted, S.B. Moulton R.E. Snow
W.D. Smith

WILLIE ROLLIE CLACK
Spring City, Tenn., April 29 -- William Rollie (Raleigh) Clack, the last of the olde families who were prominent in Rhea county from its earliest history, died at his home three miles east of Roddy, April 25, aged 80 years, of paralysis, and was buried at the Old Friendship church and burying ground in the presence of one of the largest gatherings ever congregated at that place. Mr. Clack was made a Mason in old Washington lodge in 1864 and moved his membership to Rhea Springs lodge in March, 1869. After religious services by the Rev. Dake the Masons of Rhea Springs lodge, F.&A.M., took charge and laid the body in the grave with the solemn and impressive masonic ceremonies.
Mr. Clack had held many positions of trust, as well as official positions in Rhea county and never was there heard an unkind or censorious criticism in any capacity, being well and favorably known not only in Rhea, but in Meigs and Roane counties as well. There were many of his friends at the funeral from these counties.

From the Hiwassee Association Minutes 1919
William Raleigh Clack was born in Rhea County, Tennessee, Feb. 4, 1839, died April 25th, 1919, aged 80 years, 2 months, 21 days. The subject of this sketch was a direct decendent of the pioneer settlers of East Tennessee and was one of it's most sturdy and patriotic citizens. He was always ready to contend for what he believed to be right and was willing to sacrifice his life, if need be for a principle. He professed faith in Christ in his young manhood and joined the Baptist Church. He was one of the two remaining charter members of Old Friendship church. His wife, who survives him, being the other. He has served his church continuously, since its organization, as clerk and also as deacon, a period of more than forty-three yearts. He was always prompt in his attendance at church meeting and was liberal with his means in the support of the church. Bro. clack lived through a period of history when men's souls were tried as by fire; yet he never faltered in his devotion to God or his duty to his country or his church. His greatest pleasure was to hear the gospel preached in its purity and power. His greatest ambition was to become "An heir of God and a joint heir with the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ."

ASA NEWPORT
The following obit was printed in the "Signs of the Times" Vol. 45 Middletown, N.Y., April 15, 1877 - No.8

ELDER ASA NEWPORT, an aged Baptist minister, died at his residence in Rhea County, Tenn. He was born Oct. 7, 1802, professed religion in 1829, and joined the church on the second Saturday in November, the same year. On the third Saturday in November, 1832, he was liberated by the church to exercise his gift in public; on the 4th of July, 1833, was appointed assistant clerk; on July 5th., 1833, was given a written license to preach and exhort wherever the Lord in his providence might call him; Jan. 6th, 1834, was chosen clerk; at the July meeting, 1838, was ordained to the full work of the ministry, by brethern C. Galloway, Wm. Green, J.J. Monger, and Briggs; was called to the pastoral care of the church at Hind's Valley, October 1840, and in February, 1849, by request, too the care of the church at Mt. Pleasant, Grassy Cove, Tenn., and at the same time was also petitioned to attend the church at Little Emery.
The subject of this sketch was a man with whom I have long been acquainted, and very intimately. He was taken very bad about 3 o'clock a.m. Dec. 15, 1876, and died in about twelve hours. My residence and his being about one mile apart, the family sent for me and I went at once. When I arrived I found him almost speechless. He grasped my hand, fully recognizing me, and tried to call me brother Johnson. While suffering great agony, his very countenance showed love to God and love to man. From my long and intimate acquaintance with him, socially and religiously, as a neighbor and a brother, (and may I not say as a father in the gospel?) how could I doubt but his soul is now in heaven? For christianity means something. I speak with reference to scripture. It means to follow the Lord Jesus Christ, to live soberly, righteoursly and godly in the world. By their works ye shall know them. And when I attended brother Newport in his dying moments, I was led to no other conclusion but that he lived and died a christian. He left behind an aged widow and several children, besides a large number of neighbors and friends, to mourn their loss.
(signed) James Johnson

HUGH BAXTER CLACK
May 15, 1868 - January 14, 1949
Resident of Bozeman, Mont. since 1903, born in Roddy, Tenn., married Anna Bertha East April 7, 1903, a carpenter by trade until his retirement in 1937, member of Carpenters Union local no. 557, survivors were his wife, Ernest E. Clack of Bozeman, Marvin Clack of Missoula and Reba Young of Jacksonville, Texas, granddaughter Lucille Young. Three sisters; Mrs. Sam Galloway of West Plains, Mo., - Mrs. J.H. Manis of Bradenton, Fla - a brother, R.M. Clack of Roddy, Tenn. Interred in the Sunset Hills cemetery.

HUGH B. CLACK, RESIDENT SINCE 1903, IS TAKEN
Hugh Baxter Clack, resident of Bozeman since 1903, died Saturday at the Bozeman Deaconess hospital. Clack was born in Roddy, Tenn., May 24, 1868. He was married April 7, 1903 to Anna Bertha East and came that year to Bozeman, where he since resided. A carpenter by trade, Clack was active in that work until his retirement in 1937. He was a member of local No.557 of the Carpenters Union and was affiliated with the Baptist church. In addition to his widow, survivors include three children, Ernest E. Clack of Bozeman, Marvin Clack of Missoula and Reba Young of Jacksonville, Texas; three sisters, Mrs. Sam Galloway, West Plains, Mo., Mrs Sam Sharp, Erie, Tenn., Mrs. J.H. Manis, Bradenton, Fla,; a brother R.M. Clack of Roddy, Tenn., and one grandchild Lucille Young of Jacksonville, Texas. Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock in the Dokken, Nelson and Kippen Sunset Chapel. Interment will be in Sunset Hills cemetery.

SARAH C. MANIS
February 21, 1876 - December 12, 1968
A native of Rhea County, Tennessee, lived in Tampa for 20 years, member of the Trinity Baptist Church. Survivors; a son, Lawrence T. Manis of Bartow - daughters; Mrs. Gladys A. Newson of San Antonia, Texas - Mrs. Irma M. Keever of Ellington and Mrs. Marguerite Turner of Tampa.

HUBERT C. MANIS
July 18, 1909 - July 26, 1968
Listed as survivors: Wife, Marian; son, James Morgan, 12; daughter, Jean Marie, 12; mother, Mrs. James H. Manis of Tampa, Fla; brother, Lawrence of Bartow, Fla; three sisters, Mrs. Ben Newsom of San Antonio, Tex. - Mrs. Kimball Turner of Tampa, Fla. - Mrs. Howard L. Keever of Ellenton, Fla.

THOMAS J. MANIS
April, 1948
Listed as survivors: Wife, Ethel Pickel Manis; four daughters, Mrs. Tom (Bonnie) Hammer of Hardin - Mrs. R.J. (Etta Lee) Findley of Woodsboro, Texas - Mrs. Vernie (Lona) Scofield of Novinger, Mo. - Mrs.Robt. (Ethel) Brownlee of Big Timber. Daughter, Mrs. R.A.(Beulah) Findley had passed away in Salt Lake City in 1937. He also had sixteen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren surviving.
Mr. Manis was born in Cleveland, Tenn., on Sept. 1, 1876, and grew to manhood near Kingston, Roane County, Tenn. When a young man he joined the Baptist church and remained a member throughout his lifetime. On April 6,1899, he was united in marriage with Ethel Pickel at Rhea Springs, Tenn., and in March, 1901, they came to Montana, locating at the Work Ranch on Mission Creek, with his brother, W.H. and J.H. Manis. In the fall of that year, he moved to Sweet Grass county and was engaged in ranching and stock raising until 1939 when he moved to the Gallatin Valley. Five years later the family moved to Harrison where Mr. Manis and his son, Paul, operated a stock ranch for four years.

J.M. MANIS
October 11, 1905 - July 26, 1941
Of Baton Rouge. Died after a long illness. Survived by his wife and one stepson, Corporal W.C. Blanchard, Jr.S

AMANDA J. STINECIPHER
Obituary of Amanda J. Stinecipher Written by William Raleigh Clack (1839-1919) in 1917.
Another well known footfall is missed, another family altar is mantled in mourning. Yesterday morning, March 18, just as the sun was shedding his silver rays of light on the eastern horizon, God called away the gentle spirit of Amanda Jane Stinecipher from earthly suffering and sorrow to that home that awaits His children.
Sister Amanda, the daughter of L.J. and Mary Tredway was born March 4, 1877, married A. J. Stinecipher, Jan. 5, 1893. She gave herself to Jesus at the age of 15-joined the church in Oct. 1905, to which she was faithful and true till her death, which occured March 18, 1917, at 5 o'clock a.m. at the age of 40 years and 14 days. She has left surviving her a husband and 2 children, an aged mother, 1 sister and 5 brothers.
Sister Amanda is not dead but sleepeth.
(Found in the misc. papers of William Raleigh Clack (1839-1919) in the possession of his grandson, William Baxter Clack b. 1907). Transcribed by Edna Clack Sachs 1986.

JAMES JOHNSON
from Goodspeed's History of East Tennessee, 1887
James Johnson, a well-known farmer of the First District, was born in Rhea County, Tenn., May 27, 1818. He is the youngest of nine children (four now living) born to William and Sarah (Forbish) Johnson. The father was born in Virginia in 1766. He was a tinset by trade. About 1803 or 1804, he immigrated to Rhea County, Tenn., being the seventh man who settled there. He purchased land and became a successful farmer. His death occurred about 1842. The mother was born about 1769 on New River, S.C., and died in Rhea County about 1845. For forty-eight years she was a devout member of the Primitive Baptist Church, to which her husband belonged fifty-four years.
The paternal grandfather was a native of Ireland, who settled in Virginia. Our subject has had but meager educational advantages, but by observation and reading has become possessed of a vast amount of practical knowledge. He remained with his parents until his majority. He then rented a farm in Meigs County. After raising one crop he returned home and remained until the death of his parents. January 1, 1849, he moved to Bledsoe (now Cumberland) County, and bought a farm. He engaged in the mercantile business about 1853 in Grassy Cove, Bledsoe County.
In 1857 he sold his farm and bought 200 acres of land. Since that time he has been trading. He now owns 320 acres in Rhea County and 200 in Cumberland County. July 4, 1859, he entered the store of Dr. D.M. Roddy, at Prestonville Post Office. He remained there until July 2, 1861. He then enlisted in Company G, Twenty-sixth Tennessee (Confederate Army), under command of John M. Lillard. Captain of the company was Crawford. Our subject went out as orderly sergeant, and two months later was made quartermaster. He resigned after the battle of Fort Donelson. He was the only man who brought his stock through to Murfreesboro. He was elected captain of a home company, and entered a battalion of cavalry commanded by Maj. B.F. Walker. He was discharged January 6,1864. He was in the battle of Fort Donelson, and at Beans Station, and near Chickamauga. He was never wounded nor taken prisoner. His accumulations were lost during the war. Since that time he has been successfully engaged in farming and trading. He was justice of the peace of the First District twenty- seven years. He has served as chairman of the county court. He was a delegate to the convention which nominated President Cleveland. For fifty-one years he has been a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. He is a stanch Democrat, an enterprising citizen, and firm advocate of educational interests.
December 28, 1840, he married Mary J., daughter of John O. and Jane (Simcox) Thompson. She was born March 12, 1824, in Roane County, Tenn., and died in Rhea County December 20, 1857. She was not a church member, but a believer in religion. This union resulted in eight children. Those living are William H., Calvin G., Sallie, Nettie and N.B.: those deceased are Elizabeth, Jane, and W.W. September 15, 1864, our subject married Amy, daughter of Micajah Clack. She was born in Meigs County, Tenn., February 20, 1829. She is a lady of cultivation and a member of the Baptist Church.

From the 1895 minutes of the Hiwassee Baptist Association:
IN MEMORIAM
Elder James Johnson was born in Rhea County, Tennessee, on May 27, 1818. Under the tuition of his devotedly pious father and mother he never used a profane oath, even through life. And this was the more remarkable because he grew up in the crude and wild condition of the country before civilization had made much progress. But little literary training could be had. Two or three months, at most, in the old field schools of that period for a few years was an advanced education. In this condition of affairs Bro. Johnson reached his thriteenth year when he became conscious of his lost condition. For a little more than a year he gave but little thought to any other subject.
When he had reached his fourteenth year the light shone into his dark mind and it pleased God, who called him by His grace, to reveal in him His Son, Jesus Christ. Immediately he conferred not with flesh and blood, but joined the church at Old Bethel. He was shown his sinful and helpless condition and pointed to Christ under the ministry of Elder Daneil Briggs, who was one of the pioneer and able ministers of that or any other time. Bro. Johnson's changed life bore unimpeachable testimony to a regenerated nature, which was a characteristic of the man through life and presented him as a christian of the highest type, a hero of the faith, and a faithful minister of the gospel.
In 1840 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane Thompson, of the neighborhood in which he was raised. To them were born three sons and two daughters, who survive their father. Three others died in infancy. This marriage was, in all respects, a happy one till about 1854, when his wife died. He bore his affliction without murmuring, in that sweet submisssion that said, "Thy will be done."
In 1864 he was united in marriage to Miss Amy Clack, his surviving but grief-smitten widow. Again Bro. Johnson was fortunate in his choice of a partner, as he found a helpmate indeed in every department of their life's labor--they in full enjoyed each other's confidence and unsullied affection to the end. In 1867 he was licensed to preach.
His ministerial zeal, which appeared to be according to knowledge, led him to the strong entrenchment of confidence in him by his brethern in all of the churches, as well as by an exacting public. He soon developed in the pulpit the correct expositor of "The principles of the doctrine of Christ;" the wise counsellor, the eloquent exhorter, the judicious disciplinarian, and faithful pastor.
In 1868 he was ordained to the full work of the ministry by prayer and imposition of hands of the presbytery composed of Elders J. B. McCallon, A. Newport and R. T. Howard. He sometimes reached sublime heights when exhorting sinners to repentance. He went among them with Christ crucified, Jesus and the resurrection his only theme, "the broken spirit, the broken and contrite heart" the only human sacrifice allowed upon God's altar, then "testifying both to the jews and also to the greeks, repentance toward God and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ;" lowly and still lower humility the only way to reach the throne of grace; obedience to the ordinances and teachings of the gospel the evidences of a regenerated nature.
He was the most of his ministerial life pastor of four churches, which were fairly successful, never having any confusion among them, but "endeavoring to keep the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace. He was a living practical embodiment of the principles which he taught. A devotedly tender husband, a gentle father , thus securing obedience from his children; a kind neighbor with an open ear and hand to hear the cry and to releive the wants of the needy poor, and with songs and prayers and consoling promises ever ready to enter the homes of the sorrowing, the sick and dying; an impartial magistrate; a faithful friend, and all that enters into the make-up of a good man.
For several years he was afflicted, but uncomplainingly bore it. His last sickness was attended with great suffering. But in it all his theme was religion, and as long as his mind was clear his confidence was unshaken in the love and ability of his Savior. He died March 29, 1895, aged 76 years, 10 months and days.
The high esteem in which he was held was manifested y the immense concourse of people in attendance at his funeral services conducted by his life-long friend and fellow laborer, Elder J. B. McCallon. His remains were laid to restin the Newport cemetery. The assemblage was largely composed of the aged from Rhea, Cumberland, Roane and Meigs counties.

from the "Records of Rhea" by T.J. Campbell
CAPTAIN JAMES H. JOHNSON Colonel William Johnson, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Virginia in 1766. His wife, Sarah Forbush, was born in South Carolina in 1769. They came to Rhea County before it was a county, in 1803. He is said to be the seventh white man to settle in the territory, which was then still occupied by the Indians. The county was not organized until early in 1808. He was a commander of the county militia for a number of years; a record shows that he designated certain persons to serve as guards in the Hiwassee Garrison in 1814.
In 1859 the son, James H. Johnson, lived in the Tennessee Valley, a mile or two south of White's Creek where the Dixie Highway now crosses under the Cincinnati Southern Railroad (currently, 1997, known as the Waldo farm - EC). He was then serving as salesman in D. M. Roddy's mercantile establishment and acting as postmaster in the village of Prestonville, later to become Roddy. A record of Capt. Johnson's birth is not available, but he married to Mary J. Thompson, December 25, 1840.
In 1861, though past military age, Capt. Johnson enlisted in Company G, 26th Tennessee Infantry (Confederate) and became quartermaster of the regiment. At the Battle of Fort Donelson, where his regiment was surrendered to the Union forces under General Grant, he was the only quartermaster to escape with his stock, which he broughtto Murfreesboro. He then resigned and proceeded to raise a company of old men and boys, known in army annals as "Silver Grays." This company served in the remarkable command of Major B. F. Welcker of Roane County, and the organization of which it was a part held the Confederate line from the Tennessee River at Citico Creek to Missionary Ridge, when General Rosecrans was being beseiged in Chattanooga after the Battle of Chickamauga.
Capt. Johnson was among the honored citizens of the upper end of Rhea County. A Baptist minister and a Democrat, he was always outspoken in his opinions on any question or issue. He was an alternate delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1884, which nominated Grover Cleveland and Thomas A. Hendricks for president and vice-president. He later had the pleasure, subsequently, of personally felicitating Mr. Hendricks on his election.

MISS TOMMIE CLACK
Abilene Reporter News - Saturday, February 25, 1989
Services for Miss Tommie Clack, 106, a longtime public school teacher dedicated to historical preservation, will be at 3 p.m. Saturday at the Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest.
The Rev. David Puckett is officiating. Burial will be at Cedar Hill Cemetery, under the direction of Elliott-Hamil Funeral Home.
Miss Tommie died Thursday morning, February 21, 1989. Born in Abilene, Texas, in 1882, a year after the town was founded, Miss Tommie Hazelwood Clack was the daughter of Taylor County pioneers.
Making her mark as an Abilene High School teacher who influenced several generations, she later championed area historical efforts.
She received numerous honors, including induction in the Texas Women's Hall of Fame in 1987, and, several years before, an honorary degree from Abilene Christian University. In 1988 she was honored as a Pathfinder, a honor given to county women of accomplishment.
Survivors include her nephew, Kerry Clack of Dallas, and her niece Patricia Ann "Pat" Serenbetz of Redondo Beach, California.
Pallbearers include Bobby Sayles, Conner Robinson, James W. Steward, Dr. Joe Humphrey, William Cree, Harwell Barber and former state Senator Grant Jones.
Miss Tommie Clack left a lasting impression on many students at Abilene High from 1917 to 1950. In addition, the revered English teacher has been contributing to the education of young people since 1983.
Since then, 55 Taylor County high school students have received a total of $75,000 in scholarships from the Clack Educational Fund, said Robert Sayles, chairman of the board of trustees which administers the fund.
The fund was started on Miss Tommie's 100th birthday, April 29, 1982, in honor of her and her sister, the late Miss Bobbie Clack, also an Abilene High School teacher.
A drive collected $85,000 with interest from the fund going toward scholarships, Sayles said. The first scholarships were given to 1983 graduates.
During the last several years, 10 of the $1,500 scholarships have been awarded each year. Some of the endowment has been used for scholarships, so the fund now has $70,000, he said.
"It was very dear to Miss Tommie to see these students receive scholarships," Sayles said. "She enjoyed meeting the students each year until her health failed." Sayles said tax-deductible contributions may be made to the Clack Educational Fund, P. O. Box 219, Tuscola, Texas 79562.

"Chieftain" McMurry University Spring 1989 p. 30
OBITUARIES
Tommie Hazelwood Clack of Abilene died March 2 at age 106. Services were held March 4 at the Episcopal Church of the Heavenly Rest in Abilene.
She was a longtime public school teacher dedicated to historical preservation.
The daughter of Taylor County pioneers, she was born in Abilene in 1882, a year after the town was founded. Her family attended First United Methodist Church, Abilene's original Methodist Church. She graduated from Abilene High School in 1901. She attended Peabody Institute in Nashville, Simmons Cllege (now Hardin-Simmons University), the University of California in Berkeley, and the University of Chicago before receiving her bachelor's degree from McMurry.
As an Abilene High School teacher from 1917 to 1950, she influenced several generations of students and later encouraged area historical study.
Among her numerous honors were induction into the Texas Women's Hall of Fame in 1987, and awarding of an honorary degree from Abilene Christian University.
The Clack Educational Fund, started in honor of her 100th birthday in 1982, contributes to the education of Taylor County young people. A drive by Abilenians collected $85,000 for the fund in honor of Miss Tommie and her late sister, Miss Bobbie Clack, also an Abilene High School teacher.
Survivors include a nephew, Kerry Clack, of Dallas, Texas; and a niece Patricia Ann Serenbetz, of Redondo Beach, California.

Annie Bessie Lambert Clack
Abilene Reporter News - Wednesday, September 24, 1997
Merkel, Texas - Bessie Clack, 97, died Tuesday, September 23, 1997, in Merkel.
Services will be at 2 p.m. Thursday in Merkel First Baptist Church with the Revs. Larry Howard (her grandson) and Jimmy Griffith officiating. Burial will be in Rose Hill Cemetery, directed by Starbuck Funeral Home.
Mrs. Clack was born in Emmitt, Oklahoma, and was a homemaker. She was a charter member of the Merkel Senior Citizens. She was a church clerk and Sunday school secretary at First Baptist Church, and was the widow of Elbert Ross Clack, whom she married in 1916 in Durant, Oklahoma.
Survivors include one son, Morris Clack of Abilene; one daughter, Nadine Howard of Merkel; five grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.

Harriet Sellers Brady
From the Hiwassee Association Minutes 1919
Harriet (Sellers) Brady was born April 29, 1838, died December 18, 1918. Was married to Smith Brady Jan. 29, 1856. Professed faith in christ December 1866, joined Fellowship church and was baptised in 1869. She joined Old Friendship church by letter in November 1905. Sister Brady was one of the oldest and most faithful members in the Hiwassee Association. She was a daughter of Elder Micah Sellers, who was clerk of the Convention that organized the Hiwassee Baptist Association, and was one of the leading ministers of the gospel of his time. She was faithful to her friends, her church, and her God, and was always ready to help the needy, console the sorrowing, or reprove the wayward. Although it seemed she had more than her share of trials and tribulations, yet she never faltered in her fidelity to God, whom, she had faith to believe, "doeth all things well." "God chasteneth whomsoever he loveth." Her body was laid to rest in Old Friendship cemetery, but her soul has gone to that blessed rest prepared for the faithful.

The following is from a newspaper article:
SAM J. GALLOWAY, PIONEER, SUCCUMBS AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Former representative in State Legislature, had long, successful career as businessman and farmer
Samuel J. Galloway, 80 years old, formerly Howell county's representative in the state legislature, and who was a member of one of the county's most prominent pioneer families, died at his hom on Minnesota avenue at 6 o'clock Sunday morning, death following a long invalidism from a heart ailment.
Mr. Galloway, who was first stricken five years ago while he and Mrs. Galloway were spending the winter in Florida, has since been very frail. Thoroughout last week he had not been so well as usual, but he seemed quite strong Saturday night, and sat up in bed during the evening to read the evening newspapers. About midnight he aroused Mrs. Galloway, who found him very ill. A physician was summoned, but his condition grew rapidly worse until the end.
For many years prominent in church, business, agriculture and political circles, Mr. Galloway was known to a host of friends throughout the county, his always kindly and happy disposition winning friends wherever he went.
Stockholder in West Plains Bank
He has for many years been a stockholder in the West Plains Bank, although he had devoted the major portion of his life to agriculture. Born in Howell County. A native of Howell county, he was born on the old G.W. (Uncle Wash) Galloway homestead, adjoining West Plains on the north-west on the Missouri avenue road. His father was one of the earlist pioneer farmers and Baptist ministers of the county. The elder Galloway, who came to Howell county from Tennessee, was captain of a company of Confederate soldiers, which he organized and commanded during the Civil War. During his earlier years Samuel J. Galloway was employed in the old Langston Brothers store in West Plains, later moving to his father's homestead, where for many years he was one of the most successful farmter and livestock dealers of the county. His marriage to Miss Vesta Clack of Roddy, Tenn., who survives him, took place September 15, 1887, in Roddy, the marriage being the culmination of a "love-at-first-sight" romance. Mr. Galloway had gone to Tennessee for a visit to the ancestral home of the Galloways, and when he met Miss Clack, a lovely, fragile blonde, he told a relative that he had found his wife. One year later he returned to Roddy to claim her as his bride. Twelve years ago Mr. and Mrs. Galloway decided to retire from the active duties of their farm life and moved to West Plains, purchasing the attractive home on Minnesota avenue, where Mr. Galloway passed away. To Legislature in 1926 Mr. Galloway, a life-long democrat and long a well known leader in democratic circles here, was elected Howell county's representative in the state legislature in 1926, and serrved in the 52nd, 53rd and 54th general assemblies. While in the legislature he served on various important committees, being a member of committees on agriculture, banks and banking, constitutional amendments, teachers colleges and others. Throughout his life he has been an ardent member of the Primitive Baptist church, and was exceptionally well informed on the scriptures, of which he was a constant reader. Besides his wodow, he is survived by four daughters and two sons, Mrs. Beatrice Cook, Mrs. Earl Armstrong, Mrs. Ralph Armstrong and Paul Galloway of West Plains, Clark Galloway of San Angelo, Tex., and Mrs. Beulah Bishop of Springfield. One son, Raleigh Galloway, who was cashier of the West Plains Bank at the time of his death, died in 1926, and another son, Willie, 12, was killed when thrown from a horse here twenty-five years ago. There are six grandchildren, Dr. Robert Cook of Peoria, Ill., Tommy Galloway of West Plains, and Sammy Jack Galloway, who is a student in Kansas State Agriculture College, Manhattan, Kans., Mrs. Wayne Bess and Charles Armstrong of West Plains, and Norma Jean Bishop of Springfield. Mr. Galloway, who was one of a family of thirteen children, is survived only by two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Lasater and Miss Lizzie Galloway of West Plains. Miss Galloway is ill at her home in the west end, and probably will be unable to attend her brother's funeral.

Funeral Tuesday
Funeral services for Mr. Galloway will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the First Baptist church, with the Rev. B. F. Dinwiddie, pastor, in charge. Assisting in the service will be the Rev. Jim Reeves, a pioneer Baptist minister of Grimmett and a long-time friend of Mr. Galloway. Members of the local I. O. O. F. lodge, of which Mr. Galloway was a member, will attend. All of the sons and daughters of Mr. Galloway will be here for the services. Mr. and Mrs. Clark Galloway started for West Plains from San Angelo yesterday morning, and arrived here today. Mrs. Cook, who was transacting business in Springfield, and her sister, Mrs. Bishop of Springfield, motored to West Plains Saturday night immediately after receiving a message announcing the critical condition of their father, but were unable to reach his bedside before he passed away.

SAM J. GALLOWAY, PIONEER, SUCCUMBS AFTER LONG ILLNESS Samuel J. Galloway, 80 years old, formerly Howell county's representative in the state legislature, and who was a member of one of the county's most prominent pioneer families, died at his home on Minnesota avenue at 6 o'clock Sunday morning, death following a long invalidism from a heart ailment. Mr. Galloway, who was first stricken five years ago while he and Mrs. Galloway were spending the winter in Florida, has since been very frail. Throughout last week he had not been so well as usual, but he seemed quite strong Saturday night, and sat up in bed during the evening to read the evening newspapers. About midnight he aroused Mrs. Galloway, who found him very ill. A physician was summoned, but his condition grew rapidly worse until the end. For many years prominent in church, business, agriculture and political circles, Mr. Galloway was known to a host of friends throughout the county, his always kindly and happy disposition winning friends wherever he went. He has for many years been a stockholder in the West Plains Bank, although he had devoted the major portion of his life to agriculture. A native of Howell county, he was born on the old G.W. (Uncle Wash) Galloway homestead, adjoining West Plains on the north-west on the Missouri avenue road. His father was one of the earliest pioneer farmers and Baptist ministers of the county. The elder Galloway, who came to Howell county from Tennessee, was captain of a company of Confederate soldiers, which he organized and commanded during the Civil War. During his earlier years Samuel J. Galloway was employed in the old Langston Brothers store in West Plains, later moving to his father's homestead, where for many years he was one of the most successful farmers and livestock dealers of the county. His marriage to Miss Vesta Clack of Roddy, Tenn., who survives him, took place September 15, 1887, in Roddy, the marriage being the culmination of a "love-at-first-sight" romance. Mr. Galloway had gone to Tennessee for a visit to the ancestral home of the Galloways, and when he met Miss Clack, a lovely, fragile blonde, he told a relative that he had found his wife. One year later he returned to Roddy to claim her as his bride. Twelve years ago Mr. and Mrs. Galloway decided to retire from the active duties of their farm life and moved to West Plains, purchasing the attractive home on Minnesota avenue, where Mr. Galloway passed away. Mr. Galloway, a life-long democrat and long a well known leader in democratic circles here, was elected Howell county's representative in the state legislature in 1926, and served in the 52nd, 53rd and 54th general assemblies. While in the legislature he served on various important committees, being a member of committees on agriculture, banks and banking, constitutional amendments, teachers colleges and others. Throughout his life he has been an ardent member of the Primitive Baptist church, and was exceptionally well informed on the scriptures, of which he was a constant reader. Besides his widow, he is survived by four daughters and two sons, Mrs. Beatrice Cook, Mrs. Earl Armstrong, Mrs. Ralph Armstrong and Paul Galloway of West Plains, Clark Galloway of San Angelo, Tex., and Mrs. Beulah Bishop of Springfield. One son, Raleigh Galloway, who was cashier of the West Plains Bank at the time of his death, died in 1926, and another son, Willie, 12, was killed when thrown from a horse here twenty-five years ago. There are six grandchildren, Dr. Robert Cook of Peoria, Ill., Tommy Galloway of West Plains, and Sammy Jack Galloway, who is a student in Kansas State Agriculture College, Manhattan, Kans., Mrs. Wayne Bess and Charles Armstrong of West Plains, and Norma Jean Bishop of Springfield. Mr. Galloway, who was one of a family of thirteen children, is survived only by two sisters, Mrs. Sarah Lasater and Miss Lizzie Galloway of West Plains. Miss Galloway is ill at her home in the west end, and probably will be unable to attend her brother's funeral. Funeral services for Mr. Galloway will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the First Baptist church, with the Rev. B. F. Dinwiddie, pastor, in charge. Assisting in the service will be the Rev. Jim Reeves, a pioneer Baptist minister of Grimmett and a long-time friend of Mr. Galloway. Members of the local I. O. O. F. lodge, of which Mr. Galloway was a member, will attend. All of the sons and daughters of Mr. Galloway will be here for the services. Mr. and Mrs. Clark Galloway started for West Plains from San Angelo yesterday morning, and arrived here today. Mrs. Cook, who was transacting business in Springfield, and her sister, Mrs. Bishop of Springfield, motored to West Plains Saturday night immediately after receiving a message announcing the critical condition of their father, but were unable to reach his bedside before he passed away.

Tulsa World:
Grady W. CLACK, 87, a longtime resident of Okmulgee, passed away on Saturday, August 8, 1998 in Tulsa, OK. Mr. Clack was born on April 8, 1911 to Rufus Gilbert and Fanny Clack in Abilene, TX. Grady was educated at Southeastern State University and graduated with a Master's degree in Education from Oklahoma State University. He was an officer in the Navy during WW11 and moved to Okmulgee in 1947 to help start Oklahoma State Tech, where he served as Registrar and Dean of Adademic Affairs before retiring in 1976. He was an avid gardener, a 32nd degree Mason and a long time member of the First Baptist Church of Okmulgee. Mr. Clack is survived by: his wife of 62 years, Joan Koleta Clack of the home; 3 sons, Charles B. Clack and wife, Pennie of Garland , TX, Thomas E. Clack and wife, Carolyn of Dallas, TX, Jerry D. Clack and wife, Donna of Tulsa, OK; 1 sister, Evaughn Hackler of Abernathy, TX; 7 grandchildren, Cathey and Sam Painter of Los Angeles, CA, Phil Clack of Tulsa, OK, Kelly and Greg Boudreau of Frederick, OK, Stacy Clack of Los Angeles, CA, Brian Clack of Dallas, TX, Joanna Clack of Dallas, TX, Erin Clack of Tulsa, OK; and 3 great-grandchildren. He will be lovingly remembered by his family and all those who knew him. Funeral service will be held Wednesday, August 12, 1998 at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church in Okmulgee, OK with Dr. Dennis Taylor officiating. Burial will follow in the Highland Cemetery in Durant, OK under the direction of the Kelley Funeral Home of Okmulgee, OK.

From the 1914 Hiwassee Baptist Association Minutes: Brethern, since our last annual meeting the name of one of our beloved brethren has been forever stricken from the church roll, and from the roll of life, by the ruler of the universe.
Bro. James T Brady (NOTE: This is James Knox Polk Brady, not James T Brady, printing error
Brethern, since our last annual meeting the name of one of our beloved brethren has been forever stricken from the church roll, and from the roll of life, by the ruler of the universe.
was born in Rhea County, Tenn., Nov 10, 1848, and died Aug. 21, 1914, in the 66th. year of his age. He was the son of Farley and Sarah Brady, and was the last surviver of that large and prosperous family. Bro. Brady joined Old Friendship Church and was baptised by the pastor Eld. James Johnson on the 3rd. sunday in Nov. 1894. He lived a consistant Christian life, and was a faithful member of this church for nearly twenty years. The Christian's faith and hope were his; so that his peaceful death met with a calm and quiet resignation. Over Bro. Brady the grave could win no victory, and for him death had no sting. A devoted wife and nine children survive him. The funeral services were conducted at his late residence on the 22nd. of Aug. by his pastor, Eld. P.R. Brown.
By the Church Clerk (W.R. Clack)

A.J. Stinecipher
Mr. A.J. Stinecipher, aged 56, died suddenly Saturday at his home near Roddy. Mr. Stinecipher had been in poor health for some time, suffering from a dropsical condition. Ha had been a member of the Friendship Baptist church for a number of years, from which church the funeral was conducted Sunday afternoon by the Rev. T.A. Dake of NMeigs County. Interment was in Friendship cemetery. Besides his widow, he leaves a son George, and daughter, Miss Daisy, both of near Roddy. Two brothers also survive.

Sarah Kerr
Died on Monday February 24, 1897, Mrs. Sarah Kerr, wife of Robert Kerr. She was 49 years of age, was converted and joined the Baptist church 30 years ago. Since that time she has been a consistent christian loved by all who knew her. She had an affection of the mind which had become so serious that she was brought to Republic for treatment but the trouble was too deep seated and all treatment proved unavailing. She died in the christian faith surrounded by her family and friends. She was buried in the family grave yard in Lawrence county on Thursday.

Margaret J (Garrison) Smith
Oct. 5, 1912 (Newspaper clipping)
Our community was greatly shocked Tuesday morning, Oct 1, to learn of the death of Mrs. Margaret J. Smith, wife of Esq. W.D. Smith. She was apparently in good healt and arose early Tuesday morning and assisted in preparing breakfast for her family, but hardly had they finished the meal when Mrs. Smith complained of a severe headache and a few moments later was stricken with appoplexy and died before medical aid could be summoned. Mrs. Smith was 43 years of age and had been a member of the Baptist church about 27 years. She was a devout chirstian, a kind neighbor, and a devoted and affectionate wife and mother. A husband, six children, an aged mother and several brothers and sisters survive her, all of whom will miss her gentle ministering hand and wise counceil, but the sweet influence of her noble christian life will still linger with the, bidding them to come up higher. Mrs. Smith's character was woven of graces, which, like jewels of rare worth, lent a luster to her life. Rev. W.T. West conducted the funeral services at 10 a.m. Wednesday, at the Newport Cemetery; then surrounded by a large crowd of those who knew and loved her, all that was mortal of this good woman was tenderly laid to rest.

Newspaper article dated 1913, West Plains, MO.
Fatal Accident
Willie Galloway Killed by a Fall From a Horse
William J Galloway, aged twelve years, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Galloway was almost instantly killed Wednesday evening of this week at about seven o'clock by being thrown from a horse.
At the time of the accident he, with his brother Paul a few years his elder were coming to town from the Galloway home adjoining this city on the west and were riding a young horse; Paul riding in front on the saddle and Willie riding behind. As they turned into West Main Street from Missouri Avenue, they saw the light from an automible coming from the direction of the square and knowing that the horse was afraid they decided to turn in on Garfield Ave.
The car belonged to Dr. A.H. Thornburgh and was being driven by the Doctor himself. He also turned in to Garfield Avenue and when he saw the horse was frightened immediately brought the car to a stand still. The horse had already been scared by some wheeled scrapers and road tools belonging to the street department which were on Missouri Avenue and was in a nervous state. As the car started to make the turn at Garfield Ave., and the light flashed on the horse it began plunging and seemed to get beyond the control of the riders as it is a very strong animal.
As one who witnessed the accident described it the horse appeared to be running almost sideways and at a avery rapied rate. The Doctor, as soon as the horse plunged into the dark, started the car in the same direction and heard the boy as he fell off. He went at once and found him lying in the street in front of the C. Rosser residence and getting out of the car called for help. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Renfrow were at the crossing on West Main and the former ran to the scene of the accident and was joined by Mr. G.V. Carter who was also passing at the time. After a hasty examination the injured youth was carried to the Thornburgh residence in the next block and lived but a few minutes, death being caused by a fracture of the scull at the base of the brain. As they were picking the young boy up his brother Paul came up having been also thrown off a short distance father down the street. He was taken in the car to the Thornburgh residence and bravely fought off collapsing, although severly cut on the head, so that Dr. Thornburgh and Dr. Shuttee could evote their attention to William.
Paul was not seriously injured and was taken home as was the body of the younger boy a short time after the accident.
The parents, brothers and sisters were quickly summoned but did not arrive until after death had occured.
It was one of those unfortunate and unavoidable accidnets in which no one was to blame and was not caused by carelessness or indifference on the part of anyone.
Dr. Thornburgh was much distressed and shocked by the fearful affair and did everything in his power both before and after the event.
The funeral was held at 2:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 2nd at the Baptist church, Rev. J.R. Blythe, the Baptist pastor, in charge, and interment was made in Oaklawn cemetery. Besides his parents, there are four sisters and three brothers: Mrs. Beatrice Cook, and Jessie, Beulah and Amy Galloway, and Raleigh, Clarke and Paul Galloway. The bereaved family has the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community.

Isabella Gist Wilson Clack
Died Dec. 30, 1895
Mrs. Clack, wife of Wm. Clack, of the Third district, died at her home last Monday night. Mrs. Clack was very old and her health had been bad for several months. She was a good Christian woman and numbered her friends by the score. Rev. J.A. Whitener, of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of Dayton, preached the funeral at the residence last Wednesday morning, and the remains were laid to rest in the Clack graveyard the evening of the same day.

In Memoriam
Died, May 9th, 1872, at Stockton, California, Mrs. Lamira Katherine John, wife of Chas. P.S. John, formerly Miss Clack.
She was born in Rhea county, Tennessee, November 16th, 1829, married to C.P.S. John April 17th, 1867, removed with her husband to California, March 1870, where she passed the residue of her days. She profess religion in her youth, and joined the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which she lived a most acceptable member to the end of her life - most beautifully exemplifying the character of a true christian. She was quiet and unobtrusive by nature, and exhibited her profession by a scrupulous observance and sonstant practice of christian duties. While her friends with sorrowful hearts and broken spirits, view her life as a contribution to eternity, they can but feel a holy joy in contemplating her happy exit from the cares and storms of earth to the beatific realms of the New Jerusalem - As a wife, sister and friend, she was affectionate, true and generous. By her gentleness and warmth of heart she won to herself the love of all who knew her. She leaves sisters, brothers and many friends around her late home in Rhea County, and a husband in California, the tendrils of whose hearts fondly twined themselves about her and each year of her useful existence served but to strengthen the hearts pure affection.
Her life work is finished, she is now arrayed in the loveliness of Immortality, bearing on her brow the seal of the love of God. Then let us put rebellious thoughts to rest, and as we pass under the rod let us say in the very closets of our hearts, "Our Father doeth all things well." Then, fare thee well, dear one, the music of thy voice is silenced on earth forever, yet its echo borne on memory's wings remains Eolian-like to those who knew and loved her. Then rest on with the pale, sleepers of the silent city. By faith we behold thee crowned and jeweled to grace the coronet of heaven. Let us cherish her memory as the untarnished link that binds us to ___ ___ _____ ____ _____ Love her many virtuwes and a tear of sorrow to her memory.
W.R.C. Sulphur Springs, Tenn., June 15th, 1872.
(William Raleigh Clack)

RALEIGH W. GALLOWAY, PRESIDENT WEST PLAINS C. OF C., VICTIM OF PNEUMONIA ___Was One of West Plains’ Most Prominent Business Men and Member of Prominent Pioneer Family of Howell County___FUNERAL BEING HELD TODAY___Was Popular Mason, Shriner and K.P. Had served on School Board and Was Honor Graduate of Local High School Raleigh Washington Galloway, 36 years old, president of the West Plains Chamber of Commerce and also cashier of the West Plains Bank, died at his home on Curry street at 12:27 Sunday morning, following an illness of only 33 hours due to an attack of pneumonia. His sudden illness and death came as a shock to the entire community, as Mr. Galloway was at his post in the bank until 3 o’clock Friday afternoon. A few hours later his condition was so critical that all of the members of his family living at a distance were summoned to his bedside, and attending physicians were able to offer but faint hope for his recovery. Despite this fact both relatives and friends hoped against hope until Saturday afternoon, when it became apparent that the end was only a matter of a few hours. In but few instances has death claimed so useful a citizen as Raleigh Galloway, and the fact that he had not yet reached the prime of life and usefulness makes the community feel even more keenly its loss in his death. Always clean morally and straightforward and efficient in business he had, despite his lack of years, long been serving this community in many useful capacities, besides being president of the West Plains Chamber of Commerce, the highest honor that the local business men’s organization can bestow, he also had served three years as a member of the West Plains board of education, was a director in the West Plains Building and Loan Association, an active member of the Baptist church, prominent in local fraternal orders, and had always been actively interested in the welfare of the community, from business, church, education and civic standpoints. Born in West Plains, December 20, 1889, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Galloway, he was a representative of one of the oldest and most highly respected families of Howell county, his grandfather, the late Washington Galloway, having been one of the earliest pioneer settlers who came here from Tennessee. Spending his boyhood in the public schools of West Plains young Galloway was graduated from the West Plains High School, and despite the fact that he was only 16 years old, he was graduated with the highest honors, receiving the class medal and a college scholarship. After completing his high school studies he entered the Sedalia business college where he studied for a year or two, after which he went to Springfield, where he completed his studies in the Springfield Business College. Returning to West Plains he took a position with the Frisco railway company here, but his health had become impaired and he resigned the position and took up farming for a short period until he recuperated. Fourteen years ago he entered the West Plains Bank, and because of his ability soon became one of the bank’s most trusted employees and was made one of the assistant cashiers. Upon the death a few years ago of the late M. B. Clarke, for many years cashier of the bank, Galloway was elected cashier. January 9, 1913, young Galloway was married to Miss Nova Butcher, daughter of the late T. H. Butcher, also a prominent pioneer resident of Howell county. To this union was born two sons, Raleigh Thomas and Sammy Jack, who with the widow survive him. In fraternal circles he had also long been prominent, being a member of the Masonic and Knight of Pythias lodges. In the local Masonic order he had been honored with every office and at the time of his death was a district deputy grand master of the order. He also was a member of the local Knights Templar and Royal Arch Chapters of the Masonic order and of Abou Ben Adbem Shrine of Springfield. Besides the widow and two small sons, he also is urvived by his father, Sam J. Galloway, who is Howell county’s representative in the state legislature, his mother and four sisters and two brothers, who are Mrs. Ben Cook, Mrs. Earl Armstrong, Clarke Galloway and Paul Galloway all of West Plains, and Mrs. Ralph Armstrong and Mrs. Albert Bishop of Springfield, all of whom with the exception of Paul Galloway, who is attending pharmaceutical school in Brunswick, Mo., reached his bedside before his death. Clarke Galloway and his wife were visiting the latter’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. John F. Krause in Cape Girardeau, but reached there at 8 o’clock Saturday night, while the brother from Brunswick did not arrive until Sunday morning. Both the sisters from Springfield were accompanied by their husbands. Other relatives, who were summoned and arrived Saturday night and yesterday are Mrs. Galloway’s sisters, Mrs. G. H. Cobb of Norman, Okla., Mrs. Will Reeves of Portageville, Mo., and Mrs. James Ball of Wynona. Mrs. Ball is accompanied by her husband. Edward Clarke, son of the late M. B. Clarke and for several years an associate with Mr. Galloway in the West Plains Bank, also arrived yesterday from Tulsa, Okla., to attend the funeral. Funeral services are being conducted this afternoon at the Baptist church, of which Mr. Galloway had been a member since his early youth. The service is in charge of the Rev. E. L. Huckell, of Marceline, Mo., formerly pastor of the church here, owing to the fact that the present pastor, the Rev. W. E. Nestor, is ill with influenza. All business houses of the city will be closed during the funeral hour this afternoon, and business men and fraternal orders are in attendance in bodies. Hundreds of friends called at the home yesterday to offer condolence, and scores of beautiful floral offerings have been received.

Micajah Rogers Clack
Gone To A Just Reward
A shadow of gloom was cast over our little city on the morning of Sept. 23, by the announcement of the death of Rev. M.R. clack, which occurred in this city the night before. The end was not unexpected, as he had been in feeble health for some time, yet everyone who had known the deceased had learned to admire his noble traits of character, and keenly feel his loss to the community. The funeral services were held at the Baptist Church on the afternoon of the 23rd, and his remains were followed by a large concourse of friends and relatives to the City Cemetery, where they were tenderly laid to rest. Rev. T.A. Payne conducted the services. The deceased had reached the age of 67 years, 6 months and 21 days, and his entire life had been spent in doing good to his fellowman and serving his Creator in a zealous manner. He had been a minister of the gospel, of the Baptist Church, for several years, and was always earnest and persevering in his work. He had lived in and near Royse for sixteen years, and was known to almost everyone in the community. A wife and a number of other relatives are left to mourn his loss, besides a host of friends who will ever remember his noble character and kind deeds while among them. To the bereaved relatives, The News extends it's deepest sympathy in this, their sad hour, and would say that Bro. Clack is not dead, but sleeping, waiting for the last turmpet to be sounded when all the quick and the dead shall rise to Mounts on high where there will be no pains, no sorrows, no deaths; but one grand reunion of all the saints to Glory where we will all join with him in singing the songs of Zion, which he loved so well while on earth. Let us imitate his splendid life the remaing days here and we shall surely some day sit with him in heavenly places and wear a golden crown of Glory.

Card of Thanks
We desire, through your valuable paper, to thank the good people of Royse for their kindness shown us through the illness of our husband and father.
Mrs. M.O. Clack and Children

Royce City, Texas, Friday, September 30, 1904
Resolution of Respect
Resolved, 1st: Whereas the Allwise Creator has seen fit to take from our midst, Comrade M.R.Clack. We feel that we have lost one of our most useful comrades, he being our Chaplain, and that the city has lost one of it's bet citizens, bue we bow our heads to the Will of God. Resolved, 2nd: Taht we extend our heart felt sympathy and condolence to the bereaved family. Resolved 3rd: Taht we send a copy of these resolutions to the bereaved family and have them printed in our city papers, and also spread upon the minutes of our camp.
J.T. Murphy
W.H. LIindsey
John Fitzpatrick
Committee of R.E.Lee Camp 1368

Clack- Rev. M.R. Clack was born in Rhea County, Tennessee, March 30, 1836, (the article had stated he was born in Sevier County, but that is in error- EC) died September 22, 1904.
He professed faith in Christ at the age of 18 years, and united with the Missionary Baptist Church. He moved his family to Texas 26 years ago and settled in Dallas County: after a few years residence in that county, he moved to Rockwall County and settled near Royse City, where he lived on his farm until 4 years ago, when he moved to town and became proprietor of the City Hotel. At an early age he felt called to the ministyr, but kept the impression to himself, and did not tell his dearest friends concerning his impressions for a number of years. He said to me one day in a conversation inhis home, "I came to Texas hoping to drown the impressions to preach the gospel, but the Lord followed me here, and I never had any peace until I made a surrender and told the Lord I would do the best I could." He loved to talk about the revival meetings in which the Lord had graciously blessed his labors. For years this dear brother was a sufferer from bad health, but be it said to his memory, he was always cheerful and bor his sufferings as only a saint can; he read many books for a man of his education, but to him there was but one book-the Bible. A good man has gone to rest. Family and friends miss thee, dear brother, but noen could call thee back from thy rest. Many are the words of encouragement he spoke to a young pastor's heart, and they shall long be rememvered. The funeral was conducted by the writer in the presence of a large congregation in the Baptist church, of which he was a member. A wife and 3 children, wiath a large number of friends and realtives are left to mourn their loss. His last words were, "Let's have a united family in heaven."
Thornton A. Payne, pastor.

Thomas Clack
I record with sorrow the untimely death of Bro. Thomas Clack. Tommie was the only son of Bro. M.R. and Sister Margaret Clack, he was 18 years, 2 months, and 12 days old. He profesed a faith in Christ some time since and was baptised into the membership of the Prairie Valley Missionary Baptist Church. His death has left a dark gloom in the hearts of his family and friends. He was one of the best tempered and best naturd boys that I ever knew; kind to his friends, agreeable with his school mates, and many a tear was shed by them while the cold, cold clods fell on his coffin. Tommie was the main hope, comfort and support of his father in his declining years.. None knew him but to love him. It was his delight to scatter sunshine whereever he went, by his genial and pleasant manners. It is hard indeed to be reconciled to such a loss, but we would say to his dear parenets and sisters weep not:
When faith is strong and conscience clear,
And words of peace the spirits cheer,
And visioned glories half appear,
'Tis joy, 'tis triump then to die.
Then weep not for a son deceased,
Your loss is his infinite gain,
A soul uot of prison released,
And freed from his bodily pain.
With sons let us follow his flight,
And mount with his spriti above,
Escaped to the mansions of light,
And lodged in the Eden of love.

W.A. Orr, Wilmer, (Texas) April 4, 1886

Mary Clack McCart
Mary was the wife of Bro. L.R. McCart and daughter of Elder M.R. Clack of Sego, Tex. She professed faith in God at the age of fourteen years, and joined the Primitive Baptist Church in her native state when but a youth. Came to Texas and united with the Little Band Church of Primitive Baptists in Dallas County, situated in Wilmer, where she lived a consistent member till her death, which occurred Feb. 12, 1900. She had been afflicted a long time, and was apprised of her near approach unto death. She had a message sent to her absent sisters that all was well with her, and that she did not fear death, and kindly entreated them to meet her in heaven where she would be waiting and watching for them. She fell asleep in Jesus without a astruggle, and proved that she was in a blessed state. Dear father, mother, sisters and husband, I admonish you in the name of Jesus to weep not for your loved one, for she has gone to that beautiful home prepared for the pure in heart. Had she died without a hope in Christ, then your mourning might have been like the grief of David over the death of Absalom. But dear loves ones, you can but say, it was the sweet visions and hallowed light of the Lord that lifted the spirit of our sainted wife, chilc and sister above the gloom and terror of the grave, and stamped upon her clay the impress of the light ofh eaven, leaving the features beautiful in death. O! how my poor heart rejoices to know that in death it lifted the veil of mortality and unfolded in ravishing beauty to her glorified spirit the light and bliss of heaven! O! how blessed it is to die in the Lord, breathing out our life sweetly on the bosom of the blessed Jesus! We feel assured of this fact, that she sweetly sleeps in Jesus, that there is but a veil between us, and while we on this side see but dimly, she withing the veil is beholding the beauties of the paradise of God. We miss her in the social circles; her hcair is vacant in the desolate home; her voice is no longer heard in counsel; we miss her in the little church where she so sweetly filled her seat while in good health, and how her presence with her husband on our Saturday meetings cheered my poor, as their unworthy pastor, while we sit together in transacting the business of the kingdom of Christ in its militant state. But we bow in humble submission to God. Instead of despair we press forward toward the prize.
In view of that eternal crown,
We now the cross sustain,
And gladly reckon all things lost
So we but Jusus gain.

May the Lord bless all the bereaved ones and the little church at Wilmer, is the prayer of your pastor, M.E. Baldwin, Savoy, Texas.

John Sevier Clack
In Memoriam
John S. Clack, son of Micajah Clack, was born in Meigs County, Tenn., on the 2d of March, 1831, and died at his residence in Rhea County, Tennessee, on the 21st of August 1884, aged fifty-three years. His disease was Nasal Catarrh. Great caution should be used in speaking of the departed, lest in our great sympathy for the bereaved friends, and our high admiration of personal worth something might be said which savors of fulsome praise. The deceased won the respect and confidence of all who knew him by his srict integrity of character, and his quiet, peaceable life. He made a public profession of his faith in Christ by uniting with the Baptist Church at Yellow Creek in November, 1865, and was a zealous member of said church until his death. He was faithful and punctual in his attendance at church, and liberal in his contributions to all of its enterprises. He ardently loved the church, and delighted in its spiritual success; and that religion which had been his solace in life, was his support in death. His suffering were great, yet he seldom ever murmured. Several times toward the end he expressed a desire to depart, yet he patiently waited his Master's bidding. He was conscious of his near approaching dissolution, and gave some directions about his burial. His body was depostied in the tomb at 9 o'clock A.M., August 28d. He leaves a devoted wife, five children, an aged father and many relatives and friends to mourn their irreparable loss. While we, his friends, view his life as a contribution to eternity, we can but feel a holy joy in contemplating his happy exit from the cares and ills of earth to a blissful home in heaven. In conclusion, friends and relatives, I would say: Let us all be prepared to meet that brillian band of angels that bore out sleeping hisband, brother and friend, and winged their aerial flight heavenward through the silken blue vault into that blissful land where sickness and sorrow, pain and death, are felt and feared no more.
Wm. R. Clack
August 20th, 1884.

Dr. John Morgan Clack
Dr. Morgan Clack, of Rockwood, Dies
Physician, Banker, Churchman succumbs in Hospital after Operation.
Chattanooga Times Special
Rockwood, Tenn., Oct 9. - Dr. J.M. Clack, aged 65, died at 11 o'clock last night in St. Thomas hospital, Nashville, following an operating. For the past thirty-eight years Dr. Clack has been engaged in a highly successful practice of medicine in this vicinity. He had filled the office of vice-president of the State Mdeical Association, president of the East Tennessee Medical Association and president of his local county society. During the World war he was chariman of the medical advisory board. In addition to his professional activities he participated in the organization of the Rockwood National band and served this institution as vice-president and presidnet, respectively, for twenty-tweo years, resigning this office in 1927. Dr. Clack was a life-long member of the Baptist church. He is survived by his widow, Robbie Kindrick Clack, and one son, Morgan Clack, Jr; one brother, N.E. Clack of Delta, Colo., and three sisters, Mrs. Annie Chattin, of Rhea Springs; Mrs. Sam Eaves of Decatur, and Mrs. John Cats of Corpus Christi, Tex. Funeral services will bwe conducted at the home Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock by the Rev. John Davis, assisted by the REv. Mr. Alderson. Interment in Oak Grove cemetery.

Obit from the Watts Bar Lake Obxerver, August 18, 1990
James Albert Roddy
James Labert Roddy, 82, of Rockwood, died Monday, August 6, at the Rockwood Health Care Center. He was a retired machinist with the Tennessee Valley Authority.
Surviving him are his wife, Lela Clack Roddy, Rockwood, two sons, Kenneth Roddy of Rockwood and Alan Roddy of Cumberland City, Tn; one daughter, Anita Pugh of Rockwood.
Also surviving him are two brothers, Raymond and clayton Roddy, both of Rockwood, one sister, Mabel Poole of Rockwood, eight grandchildren and 10 great- grandchildren.
Services were held at Evans Mortuary Chapel in rockwood on August 8 with burial in roane Memorial Gardens. Arrangements were conducted by Evans Mortuary Chapel.

Catharine Clack Rogers and Rhoda Clack Randles
Printed in the Holston Christian Davocate, Vol 5, #36, 21 January 1851. Reprinted in "Tennessee Ancestors, Vol 4 (3) Dec 1988
Before coming to my circuit after our late conference I visited an aged relative, Mrs. Catharine Rogers, relict of the late REv. Elijah Rogers, of the Baptist Church.
She had long been a member of that Church, and was then at the close of her earthly pilgrimage. She lingered a few days after I saw her, and on the 29th of October died in great peace, and was buried with her husband, her parents, and many relaties, in the Church-Yard at Sevierville. An older sister, Mrs. Rhoda Randles, my grandmother, on hearing tht her sister was at the point of death, remarked to me that she would sson follow, and how truly was the presentiment realized!
On the 23rd of Dec., she breathed her last at my Father's residence, having spent the lat few yars of her life with my mother. They both died with a disease of the heart. My grandmother was in her 75th year, when she died; she had been sixty years a member of the Baptist Church. I think I am safe in saying, she was all that time a christian of the right sort; without seeming to know it, displaying in an eminet degree, the meekness, the humility, the gentleness, and patience, of the religion o Christ. Her house, from the time it was first opened with her husband, until it was finally closed on the marriage of all her children, and its passing into other hands, was the home of the people and ministers of the Lord Jesus. Thirty-four years ago, she was left in widowhood, with almost a helpless family. Her husband died among strangers, who, for the sympathy they manifested for him, his afflicted family have the gratitude of more than one generation of his off-spring; he sleeps in a strand land; but in a hallowed and sacred family burying ground, near John Baker's in Washington County, Va.
Patience and resignation accompainied and honored this venerable Christian during the few weeks she lingered, with their most perfect manifestations. Though it was sorrowful, it had comfort in it, to see hwer sink gradually away - calm, resigned, full of peace and joyu - she passed into a bright and cloudless heaven. She gently fell asleep, and was buried at Boyd's Creek Church, where for more than half a century she had filled her place in the Sanctuary of the Lord. Thus has passed away these two sisters; they were divided, neither in life, nor death - both were born near Sevierville - they were daughters of Spencer Clack - both brought up their scattered families in Sevier County - both finished their pilgrimage there -and both sleep near each other, waiting the resurrection morn. J.N.S. Huffaker

Rawleigh Clack
"Raleigh Clack, a son of Spencer Clack was born June 4th 1772, and was married to Mary Randels Oct. 28th 1791. His first wife having died, he was married again Aug. 15th 1816 to Martha Kerr. He was a resident of Kentucky for a time afterward moved back to East Tenn on the French Broad River, owning a large farm in the fork of French Broad and Pigeon rivers. Later he bought a large farm in the 3rd civil district of Rhea Co., Tenn. and moved to it where he spent the residue of his life.He served in the Army under Gen. Jackson in his famous campaigns againstthe Indians and was in that memorable battle of the Horse Shoe in 1814. He died Dec. 16 1842 and was buried in the Clack cemetery near his residence where a marble slab marks his last resting place." W.R. Clack

From the Minutes of the Hiwassee Association Sept 1907:
Old Friendship:Whereas in the providence of God we are called mourn the death of our beloved sister, Mrs. Amy (Clack) Johnson, widow of Elder James Johnson, deceased. Sister Johnson was born February 20, 1829, died November 5, 1906, aged 77 years, 8 months and 15 days. She professed faith in Christ and joined the Baptist Church in April 1850, and was a faithful member of the church for more than 56 years, most beautifully exemplifying the character of a true Christian. Amy was loved by all who knew her. Her funeral service was conducted by Elders S.A. Waller, Z.T. Manis and her pastor, Elder J.R. Smith and was, with tender hands, laid to rest by the side of her husband, in the Newport Cemetery. We cherish the memory of our departed sister as a _ay-mark to a beautiful home above.

From the Minutes of the Hiwassee Association Sept 1920:
"Mary Treadway
Hind's Valley church mourns the loss of sister Mary Treadway, who departed this life Oct. 31, 1919, was a member of Hind's Valley church about thirty years. She leaves five sons and one daughter to mourn her loss, but their loss is her eternal gain. Funeral services were conducted at the home of her son in Rockwood. She was buried at Newport Graveyard in Rhea County, Tenn."


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